Sweet Saffron Rice

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Recipe by Naomi Sherman
Servings

4

serves
Net Carbs

51.3

grams
Protein

2

grams
Fat

2.9

grams

Some days I pinch myself that I get to live in a foodies paradise.

The Huon Valley is full of incredibly passionate producers and I wanted to highlight a few of them with this recipe.

A while ago, I posted a sweet saffron and white wine rice, but I had a few people ask if it could be made alcohol-free and figured that I’d tweak and post it with a fabulous new photo.

I sourced the saffron from my lovely friends and clients Tas Saffron, the apple juice is from the stall two minutes along my road but I can also highly recommend the juice from Our Mate’s Farm

Grab yourself some gorgeous local honey from Bruny Island Honey and finish everything off with a generous dollop of creamy Mountain River Yoghurt.

If I could have sourced the rice and the butter from my area, I would have

If you come to the Valley, come with an empty stomach and a full wallet.
Switch the two and leave happier.

Head home and make yourself a delicious bowl of this goodness.

Enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 1 vial of saffron (fill with hot water and steep overnight)

  • 1 tablespoon of butter

  • 2/3 cup of arborio rice

  • 3 cups of fresh apple juice

  • 4 tablespoons of honey

Directions

  • Steep your saffron threads overnight.
  • Pre-heat your oven to 170 C.
  • Heat the butter over medium heat in an oven proof pot and add the rice, stirring it to toast for about 3 minutes.
  • Add the contents of the saffron vial and the honey and stir through until combined.
  • Pour the apple juice in and bring to a hard simmer.
  • Cover the pot with a lid and place in the oven.
  • Cook for 25-30 minutes, stirring once halfway through.
  • Serve with a dollop of creamy yoghurt and an additional drizzle of honey.

Nutrition Facts

4 servings per container


  • Amount Per ServingCalories228
  • % Daily Value *
  • Total Fat 2.9g 5%
    • Total Carbohydrate 51.3g 18%
      • Protein 2g 4%

        * The % Daily Value tells you how much a nutrient in a serving of food contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.