Warm Tuscan Dip

0 from 0 votes
Recipe by Naomi Sherman
Servings

20

serves
Net Carbs

3.3

grams
Protein

5.9

grams
Fat

12.7

grams

This recipe originated from the Warm Spinach and Prosciutto Dip featured in my Edible Heirlooms cookbook.

It’s a family favourite for a good reason, but this warm, cheesy bowl of yummy is going to give it a run for its money.

Combining the traditional flavour combinations of sun-dried tomato, basil and garlic, this dip is bumped to the next level with crispy morsels of pan-fried speck *drool*

If you can’t get hold of speck just use a good smoked bacon instead.

This recipe makes about 3 cups worth, so two big bowls.

I can’t tell you if it can be frozen, it never lasts that long in our house, but it keeps uncooked in the fridge for about five days.

Make it. Share it. Tag me to tell me I’m a genius.
Enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 250 grams of cream cheese

  • 1/2 cup of whole egg mayonnaise

  • 1 tablespoon of olive oil

  • 200 grams of speck or smoked bacon

  • 1 clove of garlic

  • 1/2 medium medium red onion

  • 100 grams of semi-dried tomatoes

  • 60 grams of fresh baby spinach

  • 70 grams of grated parmesan

  • 1/4 cup of shredded basil

Directions

  • Drizzle the olive oil in a frying pan and sauté the speck, garlic and red onion until nicely browned.
  • Add the sun-dried tomatoes and the spinach and cook gently until the spinach is wilted.
  • In a stand mixer, add the cream cheese, mayonnaise and salt and pepper to taste.
  • Beat until smooth and creamy, then add parmesan, wilted spinach and the contents of the pan.
  • Beat until completely combined then spoon into ramekins.
  • Bake at 180° C for 20 minutes until browned on top.
  • Perfect served with my Crack Crackers or my delicious Flaxseed Crackers…or eaten with a spoon, I won’t judge.

Nutrition Facts

20 servings per container


  • Amount Per ServingCalories149
  • % Daily Value *
  • Total Fat 12.7g 20%
    • Total Carbohydrate 3.3g 2%
      • Protein 12.7g 26%

        * The % Daily Value tells you how much a nutrient in a serving of food contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.