Honey, Lemon and Ginger Syrup

0 from 0 votes
Recipe by Naomi Sherman
Servings

20

serves
Net Carbs

20.1

grams
Protein

0.4

grams
Fat

0.2

grams

I first made a batch of this amazing super syrup about a month ago and I have made it over and over again since to give as gifts and to drink daily myself
.
In fact, this very bottle is in the post today to a friend
.
The combination of the soothing, healing and immune-boosting properties of these three ingredients is just what we all need right now
.
The best part is that it is super versatile
.
Just add 1 tablespoon of the syrup to hot or cold water – or take it as a delicious shot
.
I ‘ve been having mine with soda water as a refreshing pick me up in the afternoon, or in hot water as a soothing toddy in the evening
.
The raw honey means that it lasts for age in the fridge so you can have a bottle ready to go whenever you need a little something extra
.
And it makes a great gift
.
Enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 400 ml raw honey

  • 10 cm knob of fresh ginger

  • 2-4 lemons

Directions

  • Take two clean 375ml jars.
  • Peel and grate the ginger.
  • Thinly slice two of the lemons to start with.
  • Starting with a teaspoon of ginger, layer the ginger and lemon slices.
  • Cut more lemon if required – this really depends on the size of your lemons.
  • Keep going until you are about an inch from the top of the jar.
  • Slowly add the honey.
  • Don’t worry if you can see air pockets, they will disappear as you steep the syrup.
  • Place the lids tightly on the jars and store in a cool, dry place for a week.
  • Turn the jars and give them a light shake every day to combine all of the ingredients.
  • The lemons will release their juice, as does the ginger, creating a thin syrup.
  • Strain the syrup through a strainer and then store in a jar in the fridge for up to three months.

Nutrition Facts

20 servings per container


  • Amount Per ServingCalories84
  • % Daily Value *
  • Total Fat 0.2g 1%
    • Total Carbohydrate 20.1g 7%
      • Protein 0.4g 1%

        * The % Daily Value tells you how much a nutrient in a serving of food contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.