Best Ever Beef Cheeks

0 from 0 votes
Recipe by Naomi Sherman
Servings

4

servings
Net Carbs

3.7

grams
Protein

26.5

grams
Fat

26

grams


With the weather turning colder here, slow cooked dishes are on high rotation.

I love the ease of the one-pot cooking and there is nothing as satisfying as taking a cheap cut of meat and turning it into a lush, tender, falling apart forkful of yummy.

You could use any cut of beef suitable for slow cooking in this dish, I just have a fondness for beef cheeks.

You can also use a slow cooker if you prefer.

You know what I want you to do.
Make it. Post it. Tag me.
Enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 500 grams beef cheeks

  • 1 carrot

  • 2 stalks of celery

  • 1 onion

  • 2 cloves of garlic

  • 1 handful of fresh thyme sprigs

  • 2 bay leaves

  • 2 cups of beef stock

  • 2 tablespoons of coconut aminos

  • 1/4 cup Campfire BBQ Sauce

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil

  • Salt and pepper

Directions

  • Pre-heat your oven to 150° C
  • Finely chop your vegetables and mince the garlic.
  • Heat the oil in a heavy casserole.
  • Brown the beef cheeks until a lovely crust is on the outside and then remove from pot as sit to one side.
  • Add the celery, onion, carrot and garlic to the pot and saute until translucent, adding a touch more oil if required.
  • Return the cheeks to the pot and tuck the herbs around them.
  • Whisk the Campfire BBQ Sauce and coconut aminos into 1 cup of beef stock and pour over the cheeks.
  • Reserve the remaining stock for later.
  • Cover and cook in the oven for 4 hours.
  • (can also be cooked on low in a slow cooker for 8 hours)
  • Use the reserved stock to adjust the thickness of the resulting gravy to suit your preference.
  • Perfect served on a bed of Creamy Cauliflower Mash.

Nutrition Facts

4 servings per container


  • Amount Per ServingCalories364
  • % Daily Value *
  • Total Fat 26g 40%
    • Total Carbohydrate 3.7g 2%
      • Protein 26.5g 53%

        * The % Daily Value tells you how much a nutrient in a serving of food contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.